My Cheirie Amour - Cheiridopsis candidissima

 |Cheiridopsis candidissima floral detail|

|Cheiridopsis candidissima floral detail|

So succulents.  What's the verdict?  They're everywhere these days.  Drought tolerant, low maintenance, got some funky form going on.  The Plant Provocateur is a bit of a succulent fanatic.  One thing that always gets me about certain succulents is that they seem so unassuming.  There they are... just growing along, their form ever evolving, like some sort of sculpture erupting out of the ground.  Then when you least expect it, they flower.  Usually not your ordinary flower either.  Something extraordinary.  Something unexpected. Something special.  Some succulent flowers open and close with the daylight.  Others only appear for only 1 day or night only.  No matter how long lasting or fleeting the flower, they are a spectacle to behold.  Take for instance, Cheiridopsis candidissima.  It comes to us from South Africa.  The flowers of this funky fresh succulent are as lovely as a summer's day.  Rays of vibrant white, yellow, and orange petals radiate from a buttery center.  These flowers are quite a surprise considering from where they rise.

 |Cheiridopsis candidissima flower + foliage|

|Cheiridopsis candidissima flower + foliage|

Cheiridopsis candidissima has beautifully bizarre foliage.  Rubbery, succulent leaves of blue green finger-like foliage take on freaky shapes that fascinate. This freaky foliage grows up to 4 inches tall and likes to carpet the ground.  Mid-winter through early spring, plump flower buds rise up from this succulent shag and burst forth with high spirited hues that brighten any day.  Cheiridopsis candidissima likes full to part sun, sharp draining soil, low water (every 3 weeks or so), and temps above 25 degrees fahrenheit/-3 degrees celsius.  The great thing about this succulent is that not only does it do great in the ground but it is so easy in a container both indoors (on a windowsill) and out.  One thing to know about Cheiridopsis candidissima is that come summer it goes dormant (stops growing) and should be left dry (light watering every 4 weeks).  Come autumn it will pick up steam again in preparation for its mid-winter/early spring flower fest.  Sure is something beautiful to behold year round and especially during the dull days of winter.